December 8, 2022

Westside People

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Cuba has been devastated, and Florida has been hit hard by Hurricane Ian

Florida residents were bracing for a rough Tuesday to deal with the hurricane Ian After it destroyed part of the island of Cuba.

• Read more: Widespread power outages after Hurricane Ian hit Cuba

• Read more: Fiona: Millions in insured damage

• Read more: A state of emergency has been declared in Florida as Hurricane Ian batters western Cuba

“We took refuge in our second home. [située à Palmetto en Floride], with concrete, hurricane-proof garage doors. We boarded up all the windows, so we feel a little safer, but it’s stressful,” says Jean-Benoit Girard, a Quebecer who normally lives in Sarasota, in the same state.

For nearly a week, Florida residents faced the full force of the hurricane. Ian, Now categorized as category 3.

While the latter devastated Cuba, the country’s National Hurricane Center said it was “potentially dangerous” as it passed through the southeastern US state, with no casualties. Wind gusts of up to 200 kmph are expected last night.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has declared a state of emergency.

“The track changes a lot, but you have to be prepared because when you’re on it [dans l’ouragan]It’s too late,” said Mr., who weathered the storm with Quebec friends living in Florida. Girard says.

Cuba was devastated by Hurricane Ian, which hit the island on Tuesday.

Photo: AFP

Cuba was devastated by Hurricane Ian, which hit the island on Tuesday.

Provisions and sandbags

Floridians rushed to grocery and gas stations to avoid running out of water, food or electricity.

Tuesday was a busy day for Annie Levigne and her family in St. Petersburg, Florida’s west coast.

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“We hesitated to stay or leave, but since we had installed hurricane-proof windows, we decided to deal with the storm at home. We followed the recommendations: we had water, prepared food. We took all the businesses that could fly outside,” says the person who has lived in Florida for eight years.

Quebec residents place sandbags in front of their doors to prevent water from entering their homes in the event of a flood.

Courtesy image

Quebec residents place sandbags in front of their doors to prevent water from entering their homes in the event of a flood.

Nervousness

Mrs. Levine’s mother, Jeanette Levigne, was excited about the meeting.

“This is the first time we have seen this. We’re not used to hurricanes in Brossard,” he says over the phone.

When he had to return home to Florida, Bernard Datrumez, vacationing in Quebec, was horrified to find his home in Sarasota in disrepair.

“I have friends who take care of damage to my house, but if something big ever happens, I have no choice but to drive home. It’s very worrying to be away from home during such incidents,” she says nervously.

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